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16 Types of Ring Settings

Jan 09,2024 | Juyoyo

The setting of a ring determines the style of the ring, and different settings reveal different styles and emotions. Throughout the ages, ring settings have been constantly innovated, each showing the designer's ingenuity.


In This Blog

1. Prong/ Claw Setting
2. Shared Prong Setting
3. Surface Prong Setting
4. Bead Bright Setting
5. Illusion Setting
6. Pavé Setting
7. Micropavé Setting
8. Scallop Setting
9. Fishtail Setting
10. Bezel Setting
11. Gypsy/ Flush Setting
12. Tension Setting
13. Bar Setting
14. Channel Setting
15. Invisible Setting
16. Reverse Setting


Prong/ Claw Setting

Prong/ Claw Setting

The prong setting, also known as the claw setting, has a longer claw and, compared to other settings, the claw setting is the one that reveals the largest area of the gemstone and is, therefore, the one that best reflects the optical properties of the gemstone such as luster, transparency, and color. It also visually increases the size of the stone due to the openness of the surroundings of the setting.

The wide range of applications for claw settings has led to a more detailed classification of claw settings.

According to the number of claws: three claws, four claws, five claws, six claws, eight claws. The most common are the four-claw setting and the six-claw setting.

According to the number of claws

According to a set of claws on the number of claws: divided into a single claw, double claw, triple claws, and pointed double claw.

prong types

According to the shape of the claw section: divided into round claws, semi-circular claws, oval claws, heart-shaped claws, triangular claws, quadrangular claws, rhombus-shaped claws, corner claws, v-prong/chevron settings, diamond tipped.

According to the shape of the claw section

Benefits:

    • The prong setting provides maximum light transmission, allowing the gemstone to receive light from multiple angles, showing more sparkle and fire.
    • Less metal covers the gemstone for visibility, making it appear larger.
    • Less metal makes cleaning and maintenance relatively easy. Cleaning allows easy access to the area between the prongs.
    • Prong setting works with various gemstone shapes, including round, oval, square, and more.
    • Ring resizing is relatively easy with Prong Setting.

Disadvantages:

    • Prong setting offers relatively little protection compared to some settings with more metal covering the gemstone, and the gemstone is more susceptible to external impact or damage.
    • Prong Setting's claws may hook onto clothing or other objects, leading to the risk of deformation or claw damage.
    • The prong setting may be less suitable for more active individuals who move their hands frequently, as it is susceptible to impact or snagging.
    • After prolonged wear, the metal claws of the Prong Setting may wear out and require regular inspection and maintenance.
    • The Prong Setting may not be the most ideal choice for stones that are soft or prone to abrasion, as the stones may be more susceptible to damage.

 

Shared Prong Setting

Shared Prong

Shared prong setting is one of the most common techniques for jewelry setting and is commonly used for rings and other jewelry. In this type of setting, two adjacent stones share the same metal prongs. This results in less metal between the neighboring stones, which increases the visibility of the stones and reduces metal shading.

Benefits:

    • It reduces metal shading and makes more of the gemstone's surface visible.
    • A shared prong setting helps to increase light transmission and enhance the sparkle of the gemstone.
    • This type of setting usually creates a minimalist and modern look for those who prefer a crisp design.
    • It is easier to clean than some of the other complicated setting options.

Disadvantages:

    • May offer relatively little protection for the stones since they share the same set of claws.
    • It may limit flexibility in sizing the ring due to sharing the same set of claws.
    • This may cause gemstones to rub against each other, increasing the risk of scratches.
    • Difficult to make, requiring highly skilled artisans, and therefore may be more expensive to make.

 

Surface Prong Setting

Surface Prong Setting

Surface prong settings are very similar to shared prong settings, with the difference being that the prong and stones of surface studs are higher than the metal surface of the ring.

Benefits:

    • A surface prong setting makes the gemstone stand out more, increasing its visibility and making it more noticeable in the jewelry.
    • Because the gemstone is on the surface, the design may give the jewelry a lighter feel compared to a traditional prong setting, making it more comfortable to wear.
    • The surface prong setting may be more flexible, allowing designers to create a variety of different shapes and styles of jewelry.
    • Cleanup and maintenance may be relatively easy due to less metal contact.

Disadvantages:

    • Surface prong settings offer less protection than traditional prong settings, making the stone more susceptible to external impact or wear.
    • May require more maintenance due to the design of the smaller claws or posts.
    • The stability of the stone may be compromised due to less metal support.

 

Bead Bright Setting

Bead Bright Setting

Bead Bright Setting is a setting technique that is slightly different from traditional settings. In Bead Bright Setting, small beads of metal are used to hold the stone in place. These beads are arranged so that the stone is securely embedded and shimmers in sunlight or light.

Benefits:

    • The shimmer of the stone is enhanced by the layout of the beads, making it more attractive.
    • The small bead-like particles are designed to help increase the reflectivity of the stone, making it brighter and more noticeable in the light.
    • The ability to securely surround the gemstone reduces the risk of damage to the gemstone.
    • Suitable for a wide range of gemstone shapes, offering design flexibility.

Disadvantages:

    • Difficult to make, as small bead-like particles need to be precisely aligned and held in place.
    • Cleaning may be tedious.
    • Production costs may be higher.

Bead Bright Setting Ring

It can also be combined with a claw setting, in which small stones are set in the claw to add interest to the claw setting, making it a diamond tipped.

 

Illusion Setting

Illusion Setting ring

Illusion setting, also known as cluster setting, is a jewelry setting technique designed to make gemstones appear larger or more numerous than they are through clever design and layout. This type of setting creates an illusionary effect, making the stone more striking to the eye.

Benefits:

    • Creates a striking visual effect, making the stone appear larger or more numerous than it is.
    • Because an illusion setting can simulate a larger effect with a smaller stone, it may be more affordable than
    • using an actual larger stone.
    • This type of setting allows designers to show creativity and create unique and eye-catching jewelry designs.

Disadvantages:

    • Some illusion-setting designs may rely on tiny metal supports to maintain the illusionary effect, which may result in relatively low durability.
    • The complex fabrication process may increase production costs.
    • Not available for all gemstones.

 

Pavé Setting

Pavé Setting

Pavé setting is a common type of jewelry setting that uses a large number of tiny gemstones, usually small diamonds, arranged closely together on a metal surface to create a dense, paved effect. This type of setting creates a continuous, shimmering look and is a common choice in many jewelry designs, especially rings and necklaces.

 

Benefits:

    • Pavé setting creates a gorgeous, radiant look that makes the entire surface of the jewelry appear to be covered in small gemstones.
    • Without much metal showing between the gemstones, light can penetrate the gemstones more easily, enhancing their brilliance and fire.
    • Pavé settings allow designers to create a variety of shapes, patterns, and designs that add uniqueness to jewelry.
    • Suitable for a variety of gemstone shapes, including round, oval, and square, it offers great design flexibility.
    • With each gemstone being relatively small, Pavé setting jewelry is often relatively lightweight and more suitable for everyday wear.

Disadvantages:

    • There is less metal between the gemstones, making them more susceptible to external impact or wear.
    • More cumbersome to clean and maintain

 

Micropavé Setting

Micropavé setting is a highly precise jewelry setting technique similar to pavé setting, but in this setting smaller stones are used, usually tiny diamonds, for a more highly detailed and delicate look. Diamonds are usually set at 2 points or less, with a maximum of 3 points or they will not set easily, and a minimum of 0.3 points or fewer. Micropavé settings are designed to minimize the display of the metal so that the gemstone almost covers the entire surface of the metal.

Benefits:

    • Extremely delicate and highly detailed appearance, the entire surface of the jewelry appears to be
    • composed almost entirely of tiny gemstones.
    • Enhanced brilliance, with the use of tiny gemstones, light can penetrate more easily, enhancing the
    • brilliance and sparkle of the stone.
    • Suitable for a variety of complex shapes, including curves, crossovers, and other non-traditional shapes.

Disadvantages:

    • Less metal between the tiny stones, making the stones more susceptible to external impact or wear.
    • More cumbersome to clean and maintain
    • More difficult and costly to make.

 

Scallop Setting

Scallop Setting

Scallop setting This design style takes its name from its scallop-shell-like shape and is characterized by the formation of scallop-shell-like grooves or curved cuts around the stone, allowing it to be embedded.

Benefits:

    • Artistic look for those looking for an unconventional design.
    • Due to the fluted design, the gemstone is relatively visible, allowing for a better display of the gemstone's brilliance.
    • Suitable for gemstones of all shapes and sizes, with some design flexibility.

Disadvantages:

    • Maintenance may be more tedious and may require more detailed work.
    • The grooves of a scallop setting may be prone to snagging on clothing or other objects in some cases.

 

Fishtail Setting

Fishtail Setting

The main feature of the Fishtail setting is the fishtail-shaped metal design around the stone, creating a unique look. The V-grooves on both sides of the nail make it look like a fishtail, and if the sides are curved to match, it makes for a beautifully finished touch.

Benefits:

    • Unique and interesting look.
    • The edges of the stones are usually less obscured by the metal, enhancing the visibility of the stones.
    • This setting creates a layered, three-dimensional effect that makes the jewelry more decorative.

Disadvantages:

    • Jewelry may be relatively tedious to clean and maintain.
    • More likely to snag clothing or other objects in certain situations.

 

Bezel Setting

Bezel Setting

A bezel setting uses the edge of the metal to encircle the gemstone, creating a tight base that matches the contours of the stone. Although there is less of the gemstone's surface exposed in this way, the setting is very strong and is used very frequently in settings.

Depending on how much the metal edge surrounds the girdle of the gemstone, a bezel setting can be categorized as a full or half bezel setting. A semi-wrapped setting is one in which part of the stone's girdle is surrounded by a metal rim.

Bezel Setting ring

Benefits:

    • Increased protection for the gemstone due to the metal surround, reducing the risk of damage.
    • Smooth, neat look for those looking for a minimalist design.
    • Suitable for a variety of gemstone shapes, providing some design flexibility.
    • Low-grip design reduces the likelihood of gemstones catching on clothing or other objects during daily wear.

Drawbacks:

    • Metal surrounds a portion of the gemstone, and the gemstone is slightly less visible.
    • Relatively heavy, which may affect wearing comfort.

 

Gypsy/ Flush Setting

Gypsy/ Flush Setting

Gypsy setting, also known as flush setting, was popularized in Europe in the 19th century and is characterized by embedding the gemstone in the surface of the metal so that it is flush or nearly flush with the surface of the metal.

The gemstone is usually placed into a groove or cavity in the metal and then held in place by pressing together the edges of the metal so that it is tightly embedded with no raised claws or edges.

Benefits:

    • Provides a relatively high level of protection because the gemstone is surrounded by metal.
    • Creates a simple, elegant look for those seeking understated luxury.

Disadvantages:

    • Relatively low visibility, as the surface of the gemstone is flush with the metal.
    • Requires highly skilled artisan skills and can be expensive to make.

 

Tension Setting

Tension Setting

The most important feature of a Tension setting is that - after first turning the grooves to the side of the setting and clamping the gemstone girdle - it uses the tension of the metal to keep the gemstone in place, making it appear to be suspended in the ring.

Benefits:

    • The overhang setting makes the gemstone seem to float on the ring and draws attention to it.
    • The overhang setting does not require a lot of metal support, showcasing the gemstone to a greater
    • extent and reducing the amount of metal obscuring the gemstone.
    • The surround forcing setting is the strongest of all settings

Disadvantages:

    • Requires a high degree of hardness in both the gemstone and metal, generally only diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and moissanite, which are high-hardness gemstones, and high-hardness karat gold can do the job.
    • The craftsmanship required to make a pendant ring is very demanding and difficult. This is because the tension of the metal must be precisely calculated to ensure that the gemstone is secure yet still able to give a floating effect.
    • Because the gemstone is partially girdled into the opening, a gemstone with a tension setting will appear smaller than its actual size!

 

Bar Setting

Bar Setting

A bar setting is a type of forced setting, where the stone is held in place by grooves on either side of the metal, and two metal bars can be seen on either side of the stone when looking down. It is usually used for square main stones, but can also be used as a matching stone on the arm, where the metal bars are spaced in between the stones, giving a different rhythmic look.

 

bar settingBenefits:

    • A bar setting offers better security because it uses metal bars to protect the four edges of the stone, reducing the risk of the stone being exposed to external impact or abrasion.
    • Bar settings usually use less metal around the stone compared to some other settings, making the stone easier to see.
    • Bar settings are suitable for all shapes of gemstones, including round, oval, and square.
    • Bar settings are easier to clean because there are not many hidden areas.

Disadvantages:

    • Less light transmission, due to the presence of metal bars, bar settings may limit the transmission of light, which can affect the scintillating effect of the stone.
    • Bar settings are relatively complicated and expensive to make.
    • With intricate designs, sizing a bar-setting ring can be difficult and requires an experienced jeweler to perform the procedure.

Channel Setting

Channel Setting

A channel setting is a type of jewelry setting in which the stone is set between two parallel metal bars. These two metal bars can be secured to the surface of the jewelry, creating one or more channels along which the gemstone is set. Typically, this type of setting is used for a series of small stones, such as small diamonds or other gemstones, that are securely embedded in the metal channels.

 

Channel Setting ringBenefits: 

    • A channel setting offers relatively good security because the gemstone is surrounded by metal channels, reducing the risk of external impact or abrasion.
    • This setting creates a neat, linear look for those who prefer a minimalist design.
    • A channel setting is often used for small, elongated stones, such as small diamonds or other bar-shaped stones because it aligns the stones in a straight line across the surface of the jewelry.
    • The metal channel provides stable support for the gemstone, preventing it from moving or spinning.

Disadvantages:

    • Less light transmission can affect the scintillating effect of the gemstone.
    • There may be hidden areas between the metal channels that are difficult to clean, making cleanup relatively difficult.

 

Invisible Setting

Invisible Setting ring

Invisible setting, invented by Van Cleef & Arpels, is a unique jewelry setting technique that uses precision-designed metal grooves for nesting gemstones together to create an almost invisible metal effect. Often used to arrange stones into smooth surfaces to create a continuous pattern, this technique requires a great deal of memory on the part of the artisan who sets it. The presentation of large gemstones is the essence of the invisible setting.

Benefits:

    • Creates a seamless, continuous appearance, creating an effect where the gemstone almost floats on the surface.
    • Greater gemstone area coverage can be achieved, enhancing the visual effect.
    • With no protruding metal parts, jewelry in invisible settings feels visually smoother and potentially more comfortable.
    • This technique is particularly suited to square-cut gemstones, such as square-cut diamonds.

Disadvantages:

    • Invisible settings are a complex fabrication process that requires highly sophisticated techniques, so they are usually more expensive to produce.
    • This technique is more suitable for square-cut stones and may not be the best choice for other shapes.
    • Complicated to make, jewelry with invisible settings may be more difficult to repair when needed.
      Invisible settings are often used for small, delicate stones and may be less practical for larger stones.
      The relatively small amount of metal support may affect the stability of the gemstone.

Reverse Setting

Reverse setting, also known as back setting, is nothing new in terms of setting techniques. Still, it is interesting in that it sets the cut stone in an inverted setting, where the stone is placed at the bottom of the metal, and the transparent material allows the stone to show through the metal.

Benefits:

    • Is a unique and striking look for those looking for a non-traditional design.
    • Showing through the metal enhances the color and brilliance of the stone, creating a more vivid effect.

Disadvantages:

    • The gemstone sits at the bottom of the metal, and the relatively small amount of metal surrounding it may result in the gemstone being relatively unprotected surrounding it may result in the gemstone is relatively unprotected.
    • It is relatively complex to make, requiring a highly skilled artisan.
    • The bottom of the gemstone is exposed and may require additional maintenance to ensure that the gemstone is clean and cared for.

 

As time progresses, so do inlay styles, with more and more inlays on the horizon and more and more styles waiting to be explored.

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